Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:50:03 AM

Bath Bomb Making & The Humidity!

3 years ago
#40 Quote
What are we going to do?

We have heard from a few folks about their bath bomb making in the last week. With spring/summer season upon us, so is the humidity! And the rain! Uuuuugggggghhhhhh!

So, with that said, the baking soda and citric acid will already have higher content of moisture in it. You all may need to reduce the oil/water in your batches now til the fall season. Also, it may be a good idea to get a de-humidifier for your work area.

Let us know if you have any other suggestions as well so we can share with all other bath bomb makers out there!

Happy Bath Bombing this season!
Lee
2 years ago
#75 Quote
bathbombpress wrote:
What are we going to do?

We have heard from a few folks about their bath bomb making in the last week. With spring/summer season upon us, so is the humidity! And the rain! Uuuuugggggghhhhhh!

So, with that said, the baking soda and citric acid will already have higher content of moisture in it. You all may need to reduce the oil/water in your batches now til the fall season. Also, it may be a good idea to get a de-humidifier for your work area.

Let us know if you have any other suggestions as well so we can share with all other bath bomb makers out there!

Happy Bath Bombing this season!


It would be helpful if other bath bomb press owners shared the % of humidity that is in their work area. Also, at % do you start to see humidity affecting your mixture to the point you have to make adjustments?  

I am sure there are people from every type of environment using the press, from basically 0% to 100% humidity. I just received my press and tried it out for the first time and after some tweaking and experimenting I was able to have success with the large and mini round molds. I just did a small batch for testing and soon will try to do large batches. I hope to be able to replicate the same formula and methods again, we will see.

I am currently working in 50 - 55% humidity. I don't know if this is ok or bad? I plan on getting a dehumidifier soon, as we get closer to spring and summer I know it will be going up (I am in Southeast Louisiana). If nothing else I would like to try to keep a good consistency year round so I don't have to worry about constantly adjusting my mixture because of the weather!

Curious to hear what it is like for other people and what type of humidity they have to deal with.
2 years ago
#80 Quote
rcosgrove wrote:
I live in West Tennessee where the summertime humidity seems to average 60% or so. I have never been able to make good bath bombs when the humidity is above 40% using the following formula because the balls break apart when unmolding.

I'm using a large spherical mold, and I keep the press clean.

Sample run formula:

Baking Soda 1400g
Citric Acid 700g
Epson Salt 700g
Shea Butter 60g
Fractionated Coconut Oil 115g
Essential Oil 60g

I mill the epsom salt down to a fine powder, about the consistency of white cane sugar using a tabletop grain mill.

I mix the dry ingredients, spritzing with 70% rubbing alcohol maybe 6 spritzes. Then I trickle in the oil mixture and color. Let sit for about 5 minutes before using.

When the ambient humidity is less than 40%, this makes good bath bombs about 2/3 of the times. It's that other 1/3, plus all of that time when the humidity is above 40% that's killing me.

The bath bombs break apart when unmolding, usually into three pieces. It makes me insane. I am having no problems with premature activation (depending which ex wife you ask) I think because I'm not using any water in my process.

Do you think milling the ingredients down to the consistency of baking soda will help hold them together? Should I add corn starch? Is the basic formula OK? Should I raise the air pressure above 100?

I need suggestions. I HAVE to make bath bombs that come out of the mold whole in ambient humidity up to 60%.

Thanks in advance.


I think that you will need to reduce a few things in your recipe.  Could you try this as your recipe:

Baking Soda 1400g
Citric Acid 700g
Epson Salt 100g
Shea Butter 10g
Fractionated Coconut Oil 30g
Essential Oil 30g

When working with the melted shea butter, it will start to stiffen up after a while so will change the structure of your mix.  We have been able to make this size batch with about 10 to 20g of shea/cocoa butter.
Lee
2 years ago
#81 Quote
rcosgrove wrote:
I live in West Tennessee where the summertime humidity seems to average 60% or so. I have never been able to make good bath bombs when the humidity is above 40% using the following formula because the balls break apart when unmolding.

I'm using a large spherical mold, and I keep the press clean.

Sample run formula:

Baking Soda 1400g
Citric Acid 700g
Epson Salt 700g
Shea Butter 60g
Fractionated Coconut Oil 115g
Essential Oil 60g

I mill the epsom salt down to a fine powder, about the consistency of white cane sugar using a tabletop grain mill.

I mix the dry ingredients, spritzing with 70% rubbing alcohol maybe 6 spritzes. Then I trickle in the oil mixture and color. Let sit for about 5 minutes before using.

When the ambient humidity is less than 40%, this makes good bath bombs about 2/3 of the times. It's that other 1/3, plus all of that time when the humidity is above 40% that's killing me.

The bath bombs break apart when unmolding, usually into three pieces. It makes me insane. I am having no problems with premature activation (depending which ex wife you ask) I think because I'm not using any water in my process.

Do you think milling the ingredients down to the consistency of baking soda will help hold them together? Should I add corn starch? Is the basic formula OK? Should I raise the air pressure above 100?

I need suggestions. I HAVE to make bath bombs that come out of the mold whole in ambient humidity up to 60%.

Thanks in advance.


Sorry I forgot to mention to also try using Witch Hazel with 14% alcohol content.  This will help prevent the "premature activation" :)
Lee
2 years ago
#83 Quote
rcosgrove wrote:
OK thanks very much. I've tried that change to my formula and it made a lot of good bath bombs during a 35% humidity day. I'll try it again when the humidity gets over 50%, and I'll report back here.

In addition to your suggestions I milled my citric acid and epsom salts to a fine powder, about the same size as the baking soda, and that made a big difference in making the balls stick together when unmolding.


Oh, that's great!  I was also going to suggest grinding down the epsom and citric.  I was working with a college student last night on a school project business plan for making bath bombs and he did the same and the bombs came out smooth as silk!
Lee
2 years ago
#89 Quote
Thanks so much for sharing!  I think it will be helpful for those in high humidity areas :).
Lee